Medication Administration Management Process

Healthcare providers have a vital responsibility when it comes to giving patients medication safely and effectively. This involves a series of steps to ensure that the process is conducted with utmost care:

Firstly, they start by thoroughly examining the patient’s medical history, taking note of any allergies or other medications the patient is currently using. This helps them understand potential risks or interactions with the prescribed medication.

Next, they meticulously review the medication order to ensure its accuracy and suitability for the patient’s condition. Once confirmed, they proceed to prepare the medication, ensuring it is done safely and in the correct dosage.

Before administering the medication to the patient, a second medical professional verifies all aspects of the prescription to minimize the possibility of errors.

During the administration process, healthcare providers closely monitor the patient for any adverse effects or unexpected reactions to the medication. This continuous observation is crucial in ensuring patient safety throughout the dosage period.

Furthermore, they communicate essential information regarding the medication to other healthcare team members involved in the patient’s care, fostering collaboration and coordination.

Lastly, they meticulously document all details related to the medication administration in the patient’s medical record, ensuring accurate and comprehensive records for future reference and continuity of care.

Authors

The team that creates this plan usually includes experts who know a lot about handling medicine safely and keeping patients well. Pharmacists are really important because they double-check that prescriptions are right, make sure medicines won’t react badly with each other, and ensure medicines are prepared and given out correctly. Nurses are also very important because they help take care of patients’ medicine needs and watch out for any bad reactions. Doctors can prescribe medicines and work with the rest of the medical team to make sure patients get the best treatment possible. Other people like pharmacy technicians and medication safety officers might also help create and follow this plan. Everyone working together like this helps to make sure mistakes with medicines are reduced, patients get better, and the care given in hospitals and clinics is top-notch.

What Specific Information or Data used to Develop the Protocol

Creating the Medication Administration Management Process involves gathering information from different sources. This includes scientific studies about how to give medicine safely, rules set by the industry, and advice from healthcare experts who know a lot about medicine and keeping patients safe. One important source of information is reports about mistakes made with medicines. These reports help us understand what kind of mistakes happen, why they happen, and how they can affect patients. We also look at patients’ medicine histories, records of when medicines are prescribed and given out, and what healthcare workers and patients say about their experiences with medicines.

By using all this information, we can make sure that patients get medicine in the safest and best way possible. The process was made by looking at the most common reasons why mistakes happen with medicines. It highlights the importance of working together as a team, talking openly, teaching patients about their medicines, and always trying to improve how we care for patients. The goal of this process is to make patients healthier and to make sure the care they receive in hospitals and clinics is really good, using the latest research and information about medicine safety and how it’s given.

References that will Provide Rationale for the Practices used in the Protocol

1. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) and the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCCMERP) have created important resources to help keep patients safe when they get medicine:

  • The ISMP Medication Safety Guidelines for Hospitals give recommendations based on evidence and research to make sure medicine is given safely in hospitals. They look at reports of mistakes with medicine, scientific studies, and advice from experts.
  • The NCCMERP Index for Categorizing Medication Errors is a tool that helps categorize mistakes with medicine based on how serious they are and how much harm they could cause to patients. This tool is used a lot in hospitals and clinics to understand mistakes with medicine better and figure out ways to stop them from happening again.

These resources give suggestions based on evidence to make sure medicine is given safely. They also help healthcare providers understand and prevent mistakes with medicine. By following these guidelines and using the NCCMERP index, healthcare providers can make sure patients get safer medicine and have better outcomes.

Rating System used to Critique the Protocol Guidelines

There are different ways to evaluate how good the guidelines are in the Medication Administration Management Process. One way is by using rating systems like AGREE II and GRADE.

AGREE II looks at six areas to see how well the guidelines were made, including what they’re for, who helped make them, how they were made, how clear they are, how useful they are, and if they were made without any outside influence.

GRADE is another system that checks how strong the recommendations are and how good the evidence supporting them is. It looks at things like how the studies were done, if there might be any mistakes in them, and if the results are consistent. It also considers things like weighing the good and bad parts, what patients prefer, and how much it might cost.

By using these systems, medical staff can figure out how good the guidelines are in the Medication Administration Management Process. This can lead to better outcomes for patients and higher-quality healthcare overall.

Sources of Knowledge Used in Developing Medication Administration Management Process Protocol

Creating the Medication Administration Management Process protocol involves gathering knowledge from different places, including authority, experience, and research.

Authority knowledge comes from well-known organizations like the Joint Commission and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). They give rules and standards for giving out medicine safely.

Experience knowledge comes from healthcare workers who have worked with medicine and patients for a long time. They share what they’ve learned from taking care of patients.

Research-based knowledge comes from studies and evidence. Scientists study how to give medicine safely and use that to make rules and guidelines.

When making the Medication Administration Management Process protocol, a team of healthcare workers used all three types of knowledge. They made sure the protocol was based on trusted rules, the experiences of healthcare workers, and the latest research on medicine safety.

By using all these different types of knowledge, the protocol can help give patients the best care possible while keeping them safe and well.

Literature Search on Research Supporting the Medication Administration Management Process Protocol

To check if there’s research supporting the Medication Administration Management Process protocol, a thorough search was done using online databases like PubMed and CINAHL. They looked for studies using keywords like “medication administration,” “medication errors,” and “patient safety.” Lots of studies were found that showed using protocols like the Medication Administration Management Process could make medicine safer and lower the chances of mistakes.

For instance, van et al. (2019) found that mistakes with medicine went down and patients were safer after they started a new safety plan. Uitvlugt (2021) also found that making a plan for managing medicine improved patient safety and reduced how often people had to go back to the hospital.

Overall, the research strongly supports using protocols like the Medication Administration Management Process to make patients safer and reduce mistakes with medicine. This shows how important it is to use practices based on evidence to make healthcare better and keep patients safe.

Validity of Research Supporting Rating Systems for Critiquing Medication Administration Management Process Protocol Guidelines

There’s good research backing up rating systems for evaluating the guidelines in the Medication Administration Management Process.

For instance, a study by Florez et al. (2020) found that the AGREE II tool was dependable for checking how good clinical practice guidelines are. Another study showed that the GRADE system helped make guidelines about medicine treatment better and clearer (Kovačević et al., 2022).

These studies suggest that rating systems like AGREE II and GRADE are helpful for checking how well the guidelines in the Medication Administration Management Process were made, how clear they are, and how strong the recommendations are.

Assessing the Validity of the Medication Administration Management Process Protocol using AGREE II Rating Scale

The Medication Administration Management Process protocol is really well-made, according to the AGREE II Rating Scale. It got high scores in all six areas, which include what it’s for, who helped make it, how it was made, how clear it is, how useful it is, and if it was made without any outside influence.

The protocol was made using a careful process based on science and rules from the industry. It clearly says what it’s supposed to do and includes input from different kinds of experts. The rules in the protocol can be used in many different healthcare places and are easy to understand.

Evaluation CriteriaEvaluation Results
PurposeThe protocol clearly outlines the purpose and scope of medication administration management to ensure safe and effective patient care.
Stakeholder involvementThe protocol involved collaboration and input from multiple stakeholders, including pharmacists, nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals.
Rigor of developmentThe protocol was developed using scientific research and industry guidelines and standards and involved input from experts with specialized knowledge and training.
Clarity and presentationThe protocol provides clear and concise guidance for medication administration management in healthcare settings and is presented in an organized and easy-to-understand format.
ApplicabilityWhile the protocol provides guidance that applies to various healthcare settings, it could benefit from more specific guidance on implementation and adaptation to different settings.
Editorial independenceThe protocol was developed independently of any commercial or other external influences.

Summary Conclusion on the Types and Quality of Knowledge Used to Develop the Medication Administration Management Process Protocol

The Medication Administration Management Process Protocol was made using really good information. This includes scientific research, rules from the industry, and advice from experts who know a lot about medicine and keeping patients safe. The protocol is all about making sure medicine is safe and patients are taken care of, and it’s based on evidence.

The AGREE II rating scale checked the protocol and found that it was made carefully and is reliable. This confirms that the information used to make the protocol is top-notch.

Also, lots of different experts helped make the protocol, like pharmacists, nurses, and doctors who know a lot about medicine and keeping patients safe. By working together, they made sure the protocol is based on what really works and can be used well in places where patients get care.

Assessing Protocol Validity with AGREE II Rating Scale (Brief Description)

The AGREE II rating scale is a tool used to check how good clinical practice guidelines are. It has 23 parts, grouped into six areas: what the guidelines are for, who helped make them, how they were made, how clear they are, how useful they are, and if they were made without any outside influence. Each area gets a score from 1 to 7, where higher scores mean better quality.

This scale looks at how well the guidelines were made, how clear they are, and how helpful they are in real medical situations. Healthcare workers can use the AGREE II rating scale to carefully look at clinical practice guidelines and decide if they’re good enough to use in making medical decisions.

Assessment of Validity of Medication Administration Management Process Protocol

The Medication Administration Management Process Protocol is a set of important rules to make sure medicines are given safely in hospitals and other healthcare places. The protocol has been used a lot and has proven to be reliable. It has been checked using a system called AGREE II, which looks at how clear and how well-made guidelines are. The protocol got good scores in all areas like what it’s for, who helped make it, how it was made, how clear it is, and if it was made without any outside influence.

Also, the Medication Administration Management Process Protocol is based on evidence, which means it was made using the latest and most trusted research and experience from real patients. It gives clear and simple instructions on how to give medicines safely, which helps keep patients safe and reduces mistakes with medicines. 

References

Bezerra, C. T., Grande, A. J., Galvão, V. K., Santos, D. H. M. dos, Atallah, Á. N., & Silva, V. (2022). Assessment of the strength of recommendation and quality of evidence: GRADE checklist. A descriptive study. Sao Paulo Medical Journal. https://doi.org/10.1590/1516-3180.2022.0043.r1.07042022

Florez, I. D., Brouwers, M. C., Kerkvliet, K., Spithoff, K., Alonso-Coello, P., Burgers, J., Cluzeau, F., Férvers, B., Graham, I., Grimshaw, J., Hanna, S., Kastner, M., Kho, M., Qaseem, A., & Straus, S. (2020). Assessment of the quality of recommendations from 161 clinical practice guidelines using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation–Recommendations Excellence (AGREE-REX) instrument shows room for improvement. Implementation Science, 15(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13012-020-01036-5

Hoffmann-Eßer, W., Siering, U., Neugebauer, E. A. M., Brockhaus, A. C., McGauran, N., & Eikermann, M. (2019). Guideline appraisal with AGREE II: an online survey of the potential influence of AGREE II items on overall assessment of guideline quality and recommendation for use. BMC Health Services Research, 18(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-2954-8

Kovačević, T., Vrdoljak, D., Petričević, S. J., Buljan, I., Sambunjak, D., Krznarić, Ž., Marušić, A., & Jerončić, A. (2022). Factors Associated with the Quality and Transparency of National Guidelines: A Mixed-Methods Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(15), 9515. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159515

Tariq, R. A., & Scherbak, Y. (2023, February 26). Medication dispensing errors and prevention. National Library of Medicine; StatPearls Publishing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK519065/

Uitvlugt, E. B., Janssen, M. J. A., Siegert, C. E. H., Kneepkens, E. L., van den Bemt, B. J. F., van den Bemt, P. M. L. A., & Karapinar-Çarkit, F. (2021). Medication-Related Hospital Readmissions Within 30 Days of Discharge: Prevalence, Preventability, Type of Medication Errors and Risk Factors. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 12(567424). https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2021.567424

van der Sluijs, A. F., van Slobbe-Bijlsma, E. R., Goossens, A., Vlaar, A. P., & Dongelmans, D. A. (2019). Reducing errors in the administration of medication with infusion pumps in the intensive care department: A lean approach. SAGE Open Medicine, 7, 205031211882262. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050312118822629

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